Stena Line Joins with The Swedish Club to Test Emergency Plans

The Swedish Club and Stena Line have completed a major Emergency Response Training Exercise, designed test how Stena’s own comprehensive emergency procedures integrate with those of the authorities and support services in the event of a major incident.

The round table exercise took place last week at the Swedish Sea Rescue Society headquarters, with over sixty expert contributors taking part. The drill, jointly planned and conducted by the Club and the Swedish Joint Rescue Coordination Centre (JRCC), tested the levels of cooperation required between the resources and authorities that would be at the centre of a mass evacuation from a passenger ferry in the Gothenburg area.

The Stena Line team was headed by Bjarne Koitrand, Technical Operations Director, Jörgen Lorén, Director and Senior Master, and Jesper Waltersson, Press and Media Relations Manager. Read more

ICS Publishes Latest Flag State Performance Table with New Criteria Included

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) has published the latest version of its Flag State Performance Table, which can be downloaded free of charge via the ICS website.

The Table provides a helpful indication of the performance of individual flag states worldwide, which analyses how the administrations included deliver against a number of criteria such as port state control records, ratification of international maritime Conventions and attendance at IMO meetings. This year, a new criteria on participation in the ‘IMO Member State Audit Scheme’ has been included.

ICS Deputy Secretary General, Simon Bennett, remarked: “Following the entry into force of amendments to the relevant IMO Conventions, the IMO Member State Audit Scheme has become mandatory. This is a significant development that should make further contributions to improving maritime safety and the prevention of pollution.”

He added, “ICS also recently released a new interactive version of the Table, which contains a search facility and allows users to compare and contrast the performance of up to four flag states at a time”.

The 2017/2018 Shipping Industry Flag State Performance Table is currently being distributed among ICS national shipowners’ associations and their member companies, which cover over 80% of the world merchant fleet.


KVH Media Advisory: How HTS Technology and Connectivity as a Service (CaaS) are Changing Maritime SATCOM

Speakers from KVH and Intelsat present the advantages of HTS technology and Connectivity as a Service (CaaS) at the CMA conference in Stamford, CT

Ryan Smith from KVH and Dan Lesmez from Intelsat teamed up at CMA Shipping 2018, the annual conference of the Connecticut Maritime Association, yesterday to explain how ship owners, operators, and managers can take advantage of the commercial benefits gained from switching to High Throughput Satellite (HTS) technology by using Connectivity as a Service (CaaS).

Mr. Smith described a subscription-based plan for Connectivity as a Service (CaaS) called AgilePlans, which KVH pioneered. “The benefits of connectivity enable ships to operate more efficiently and provide a higher level of crew welfare, said Mr. Smith. “KVH’s all-inclusive CaaS offering for the maritime industry provides an advanced satellite communications solution without a costly capital expenditure or long-term commitment,” he continued. “Vessel owners and operators can enjoy a complete package including hardware, connectivity, installation at selected ports, entertainment and training content, and global support.” Read more

Thome Outlines Key Strategies for Success at CMA

Gautam Kashyap, Thome’s Vice President for Business Development, outlined the Group’s strategies for success at the 2018 Connecticut Maritime Association shipping conference.

“Ship Management is changing and the right mix of digitalisation, automation and data analytics are key criteria towards providing greater efficiency, transparency and value-added services to clients in the future,” he said.

Ship Managers will need to invest heavily in new technology to keep up with changes in the market and Thome has already started this process by developing an Operations Hub, based at its headquarters in Singapore, which enables situational awareness for both duty-personnel and Thome’s crisis teams.

This is the first stage in a three-stage process enabling remote tracking of individual ships in the fleet, passage planning, security risk assessment, weather routing, video conferencing, integrated vessel management system (NAU) implementation, and individual on-board CCTV remote monitoring.

Two additional stages of improvements in the hub are planned. Stage two will further improve efficiency and availability through operational support functions like cargo handling, port turnaround and energy efficiency monitoring.

Stage three will concentrate on advanced support covering areas like cyber security, machinery condition assessment and trouble shooting.

Crew and onshore training is also crucial and Thome has a very comprehensive programme in place to ensure that all staff receive correct and relevant training for their roles which are updated on a regular basis.

In conclusion, Mr. Kashyap felt that a company’s size would be a critical factor in being able to meet customer demands and industry requirements in the future.

Thome has grown from humble origins to having a fleet of over 400 vessels, a crew pool of over 12,000 seafarers, a shore team of over 800 people and 11 worldwide offices. This means the Group can compete on a global scale and is ready for the challenges of the future.

PaSea clarifies Hours of Work and Rest interpretation for seafarers

Maritime risk prevention firm, Prevention at Sea (PaSea), has raised concerns about the different interpretations attributed to MLC 2006 Regulation 2.3 Hours of work and hours of rest, para. 5(b) and para. 6, specifically with regards to the phrase ‘in any 24-hour period’ used when calculating crew work schedules to ensure that sufficient rest periods are taken.

Petros Achtypis, CEO of PaSea, has brought this issue to the attention of the International Labour Organisation’s (ILO’s) Labour Standards Department requesting clarification on whether the interpretation provided by his team were correct.

Specifically, the issue raised revolves around checks ‘in any 24-hour period’ and whether such checks should commence during a seafarer’s rest period.

PaSea’s stance is that this should be avoided and the reasons for this opinion is based on the fact that:

  • By not taking into consideration a part of the seafarer’s undisrupted rest period, irregularities may occur which could result in a violation of the regulations.
  •  The seafarer’s rest period should not be split into parts/sections, regardless if the rest period commenced during the previous day.For example, if a seafarer’s rest period was between 2000 of day 1 and 0400 of day 2, then the undisrupted rest time is 8 hours in total.Therefore, the beginning of ‘in any 24 h period’ checking during the rest period 2000 (day 1) – 0400 (day 2) i.e. starting at 2100, 2130, 2200, 2300 etc., should be avoided.PaSea recommends that when scheduling work patterns for crew, the ‘in any 24h period’ should commence at the start of any period of work by moving backwards 24 hours.This type of calculation clearly indicates whether the seafarer has received adequate rest in accordance with the regulations before the commencement of a new work- related task.Although the Constitution of the International Labour Office confers no special competence upon the ILO to interpret Conventions and any comment is without prejudice to what the supervisory bodies of the ILO may have to say about the issue, PaSea understands that the ILO’s Labour Standards Department supports and shares the same interpretation as PaSea.

    Examples of different scenarios are available from PaSea to demonstrate how using this system of checking ensures that the seafarer’s welfare is the priority and that only when proper rest periods have been taken should another work related task begin.


    To contact PaSea call +357 24819800 or visit the website