Shipping Industry Expresses Concern Over Recent Trade Developments

Major shipowners’ associations also give full support to the World Trade Organization.

A delegation from the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), the Asian Shipowners’ Association (ASA) and the European Community Shipowners’ Associations (ECSA) has, at the World Trade Organization (WTO) in Geneva, expressed concern over recent increases in protectionist measures. Presenting two position papers to the WTO, the shipping sector has “fully committed to the preservation and promotion of free trade policies and principles around the world.”

This comes at a time when trade barriers are becoming more prevalent and represent a worrying trend for the delivery of sustainable economic growth. The papers highlight that there has been a seven fold increase in import-restrictive trade measures since 2017. This represents an additional USD 588.3 billion of additional costs to global trade. The importance of this representation has been given heightened relevance following the decision by the United States of America to increase import tariffs on certain goods from China.

Addressing the WTO Simon Bennett, ICS Deputy Secretary General said: “It is no coincidence that the massive growth in the global economy and thus the demand for maritime services that has been seen over the past 25 years has followed the WTO’s establishment in 1995. Global maritime trade now exceeds ten billion tonnes of cargo a year, but the efficiency of the shipping sector is dependent on a rules based trading system. This requires the negotiation and adherence to multilateral trade agreements under the auspices of the WTO. Recently this success story has been the subject of unwarranted criticism and threat by certain governments, including the United States, undermining the WTO’s role as the regulator of international trade. There are no winners when you increase unilateral tariffs, which is why the best place to address disputes is at the WTO.”

137 new trade-restrictive measures were put in place between 2017 and 2018 which have added significant burden and cost to the free movement of goods.

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VIDEOTEL PROGRAMME HELPS SHIPOWNERS WITH LOW SULPHUR FUEL SWITCHOVER PROCEDURES

London, U.K. – 26th March 2015 – VideotelTM has responded to concerns from the U.S. Coast Guard about an increasing number of machinery space fuel leakages when vessels are switching to low sulphur fuel as they comply with MARPOL Annex VI, by producing a programme that will help guide shipowners through the process.

The recent lowering of acceptable sulphur limits for ships operating in Emission Control Areas (ECAs) has also led to calls from the shipowners’ organisation, BIMCO, for governments to exercise robust enforcement of these tighter controls to ensure a continued level playing field.

The Videotel programme: “The Practical Management and Switching of Marine Fuels”, details how to effectively implement fuel oil changeover procedures. It takes into consideration issues such as whether the vessel will require fuel oil service or day tank modifications; whether a crew needs to establish a fuel oil system inspection and maintenance schedule; how to check that all sensors, controls and alarms are operational; and how to ensure that fuel oil switching is done outside busy traffic lanes and designated ECAs.

Nigel Cleave, CEO of VideotelTM, said: “It is critical that crews are aware of best practice when switching heavy marine fuel oil to low sulphur fuel because without proper training, serious operational problems can occur impairing a ship’s performance or even, in a worst case scenario, damaging a ship’s main or auxiliary engines.”

The programme is available in DVD, Videotel on Demand (VOD), VOD online, and e-Learning Computer Based Training (CBT). All are accompanied by a PDF workbook which highlights key learning points.